Each sequencer channel has its own trigger panel. Each can be stepped, gated or played by midi, or triggered by any of the other 15 other sequences.

The following picture shows a trigger panel in CLOCK mode.

Trigger Panel
Trigger Panel

TRIGGER ON

Enables the trigger section. When the triggers are turned off, the sequencer channel is effectively turned off. When the panel is turned off, all the panel controls except the On button are hidden from view.

SOURCE

SOURCE and TYPE together set how the sequencer channel runs. The panel view can change depending on the combination of SOURCE and TYPE options.

The options are:

CLOCK Source

There is then only one type, a looping mode, so the TYPE panel does not display. Triggers from the input matrix are ignored. MIDI HOLD may optionally set a pitch and/or velocity offset for the loop.

MIDI Source

MIDI inputs trigger the sequencer. There are step, layer, and fugue modes for the MIDI source.

MATRIX Source

Other sequencer channels trigger the sequencer via the input matrix. As for MIDI, there are step, layer, and fugue modes for the MATRIX source.

TYPE

If the source is CLOCK, there is only one type (clock loop), so the TYPE panel is hidden. For MIDI and MATRIX sources, TYPE may be:

STEP Type

Each active event from the source (MIDI or matrix) advances the pattern by one step. At the end of the pattern, the bar also advances.

LAYER Type

The clock is gated by MIDI or matrix notes. When multiple notes are on, they play the same step with different pitch and velocity, making layers of sound. MIDI or matrix events can gate each layer.

FUGUE Type

Any event from the source starts the pattern exactly then at its beginning. The pattern runs once, then stops. Additional events from the source play the same pattern from the beginning, in fugue fashion. MIDI or matrix events can trigger each sequence run. BARS can change each consecutive pattern (in step mode) or extend the pattern until the end of the last repeat (in 1time mode).

SYNC

SYNC changes the way the clock pulses are handled (SYNC is not available in step modes).

When SYNC is off, clock pulses pass into a counter which selects the beat step. When the count value is higher than pattern length, the counter resets itself (the counter is also reset when the clock restarts and when the triggers are enabled). As a result, the next logical step in sequence always occurs when changing snaps or pattern direction; and, when starting a sequencer by turning triggers on, the counters start from that point immediately. Also, when changing tempo, the next step advance from the clock is exactly in time with the sequencer's tempo. However, multiple sequencers enabled at different times may advance to the next step on different clock cycles, even if they have the same tempo.

In SYNC mode, clock pulses are divided down by a MODULO counter. After a trigger in fugue modes, there may be a slight delay before the first note, as the clock divider waits to be in sync (that may be desirable). For different direction modes, the modulo value is inverted or converted, so changes in direction usually cause the pattern to jump to a different step. Notwithstanding, all sequences in SYNC mode are in strict time step with each other.

Generally, when playing back loops which you want to start at the same points exactly, turn SYNC on. If you are playing in real-time performance, and want fugues to start immediately on MIDI events, turn SYNC off.

  • If you have good timing and are playing in live situations, or when composing, often you'll prefer to have SYNC TO CLOCK off, because the current step does not change if you change the pattern length or tempo. If you have a slow CPU, or one of the CPUs with less math units (such as the Celeron), you may also find better performance with SYNC TO CLOCK turned off. If patterns become unsynced and you want to sync them back up, the clock panel has a RESET trigger button to help with that.
  • When SYNC is on, the MODULO counters can use significantly more CPU on machines that do not have hardware floating-point acceleration. If you have a newer CPU, the additional processor load is usually insignificant.

TRG RESET

Upon a trigger, the pattern restarts at step 0. The following triggers are available:

  • In clock mode, MIDI note-on events reset the pattern.
  • In matrix modes, the trigger is any trigger from the matrix.
  • In MIDI modes, the trigger is any MIDI note on.

In fugue mode, new triggers stop any playing fugue, as well as starting a new one. TRG RESET is not applicable in step modes, as triggers themselves advance the pattern step, so the button is hidden in step modes.

PHLD

(Available in CLOCK mode only) Causes an incoming note (from MIDI or the mouse keyboard) to transpose the pitch around middle C.

The transposition is held after the note is released, until another note is played. That is, the last note transposition is kept until the trigger is changed or turned off.

VHLD

(available in CLOCK mode only) Causes an incoming note (from MIDI or the mouse keyboard) to change the pattern's volume.

The gain change is held after the note is released, until another note is played. That is, the last note's on-velocity is applied to the output until the trigger mode is changed or the clock turned off.

SWING

(Not available in STEP modes) Delays every other note, with the amount of shuffle specified as a ratio.

  • Negative values delay the odd steps.
  • Positive values delay the even steps.

Values add a ratio of the previous step's period to the current step's period. For example:

Swing

SwingResult

1.0

If the tempo remains constant, odd pattern steps are delayed to coincide exactly with even steps.

-0.5

Odd pattern steps are delayed by 50% of the previous step's tempo.

0

No shuffle.

+0.5

Even notes are delayed by 50% of the previous step's tempo.

+1.0

If the tempo remains constant, the delayed notes exactly coincide with the next note.

If clock jitter is enabled it changes the tempo, skewing the swing amount randomly.

TEMPO, D, T

(Not available in STEP modes). Selects the base tempo of the pattern, as a ratio of the clock BPM. The D and T buttons, when on, adjust the tempo as follows:

D (Dotted Tempo)

Adjusts the tempo as for dotted notes (1.5x normal value).

T (Triplet Tempo)

Adjusts the tempo as for triplets (2/3 normal value).

D+T (4/3 Tempo)

If both D and T are turned on, the instrument provides an additional multiplier ratio of
4/3.

The following table shows the available tempo values resulting from different D and T combinations.

Tempo Values (by Panel Setting)

Panel SettingResulting Tempo
TempoD+TRatioTicks

4/1

-

384

D

6/1

576

T

8/3

256

D&T

16/3

512

2/1

-

192

D

3/1

288

T

4/3

128

D&T

8/3

256

1/1

-

96

D

3/2

144

T

2/3

64

D&T

4/3

128

3/4

-

72

D

9/16

108

T

1/2

48

D&T

1

96

3/8

-

36

D

8/16

54

T

1/4

24

D&T

1/2

48

1/2

-

48

D

3/4

72

T

1/3

32

D&T

2/3

64

1/4

-

24

D

3/8

36

T

1/6

16

D&T

1/3

32

1/8

-

12

D

3/16

18

T

1/12

8

D&T

1/6

16

1/16

-

6

D

3/32

9

T

1/24

4

D&T

1/12

8

1/32

-

3

D

3/64

4.51

T

1/48

2

D&T

1/24

4

The following table shows tempo values instead ordered by 1/96 clock ticks.

Tempo Values (by Tick)

Desired TempoPanel Setting
TicksRatioTempoD, T

576

6/1

4/1

D

512

16/3

4/1

D&T

384

-

4/1

-

288

3/1

2/1

D

256

8/3

4/1

T

2/1

D&T

192

-

2/1

-

144

3/2

1/1

D

128

4/3

2/1

T

128

4/3

1/1

D&T

108

9/16

3/4

D

96

1

1/1

-

3/4

D&T

72

3/4

3/4

-

1/2

D

64

2/3

1/1

T

1/2

D&T

54

9/16

3/8

D

48

1/2

3/4

T

3/8

D&T

1/2

-

36

3/8

3/8

-

1/4

D

32

1/3

1/2

T

1/4

D&T

24

1/4

3/8

T

1/4

-

18

3/16

1/8

D

16

1/6

1/4

T

1/8

D&T

12

1/8

-

9

3/32

1/16

D

8

1/12

1/8

T

1/16

D&T

6

-

1/16

-

5

5/96

1/32

D&T

4

1/24

1/16

T

1/32

D

3

1/32

1/32

-

2

1/48

1/32

T

Some other controls can vary the tempo timing:

  • When the bar sequencer is enabled, the bar sequencer may scale tempo values for each pattern cycle.
  • The shuffle control adjusts timing between steps
  • Clock jitter adds random variation.

DIR (Triggers)

The Trigger DIRECTION provides a number of ways to change how the pattern plays. The 'stagger' patterns wrap to fit in the selected pattern length.

Direction Settings

DIRDescription

>

Plays pattern forward.

<

Plays pattern backwards.

><

Plays pattern forwards, then backwards.

<>

Plays backwards, then forwards.

> 13

Plays first stagger pattern, 1-3-2-4-5-7-6-8...

> 24

Plays second stagger pattern, 1-2-4-3-5-7-8-7...

>< 13

Plays first stagger pattern forwards, then backwards.

>< 24

Plays second stagger pattern forwards, then backwards.

< 31

Reverses the first stagger pattern, playing it backwards.

< 24

Reverses second stagger pattern, playing it backwards.

<>13

Plays first stagger pattern backwards, then forwards.

<>42

Plays second stagger pattern backwards, then forwards.

> ba

Shuffles alternate notes, 2-1-4-3-5-4....

< ab

Shuffles notes in reverse and play backwards.

>< ab

Plays shuffled notes forwards, then backwards.

>< 13

Plays shuffled notes backwards, then forwards.

The direction logic is fully polyphonic, so multiple patterns playing on the same sequencer channel can have different directions.

Pattern reversal with fugue mode varies, depending on the trigger type:

  • In step and layer modes, the pattern reverses at the end of each pattern cycle.
  • In fugue modes with bar steps, each trigger causes the main pattern to play once, and the direction changes on each pattern cycle.
  • In fugue mode with bar songs, each trigger causes the main pattern to repeat in one direction for an entire bar cycle, and the direction changes on each new bar song.

STEP MODE OPTIONS

The step mode has no clock controls (these are SYNC, TRG RESET, TEMPO, and SHUFFLE). So when you choose step mode, different controls appear instead.

NOLOOP

When enabled, then when the last step is reached, the pattern does not loop, and the pattern stops playing.

NOLOOP is a convenient way to end a song containing loops if you do not want to use snap changes. To do so, set a channel to matrix step mode, and trigger it occasionally from some loop. Modulate all the loop velocities by the NOLOOP sequence, and set the velocity of its last step to zero. Thus the song goes silent when the NOLOOP channel reaches its last step.

MULT

Enable poly mode. Sequencers in matrix and MIDI step mode can be monophonic or fully polyphonic, as follows:

  • When MULT is on, a stepper channel issues all received steps in the same clock cycle to the output and modulation matrix in the same cycle. For example, if three sequencer channels trigger one matrix stepper all at once, the stepper plays the next three notes in its sequence all at once, as a chord. When playing simultaneous notes from multiple trigger sources, the lower sequencer channel number gets first priority in the pattern table order, and the highest sequencer channel number sets the output modulation issued by the stepper channel. Modulations from the channel still affect other sequencers in the same clock cycle.
  • If MULT is off, the sequencer filters out multiple triggers received in the same cycle, and only plays the last received one.

FWD, BACK RESTART STEP

Moves the current point in the pattern without triggering a note, as follows:

  • FWD: advances the pattern one step.
  • BACK: moves back one step:
  • RESTART: puts the pattern back at the first step.

Version Notes

In version v099:

  • SYNC uses modulo dividers instead of counter resets.
  • The (a,b) stagger options for direction were added.
  • In step mode, there are new options for selecting the current step.
  • Direction behavior changed. Previously, if a fugue sequence was playing and another fugue started on the same sequencer channel, and direction was reversible, then both fugues reversed instead of just the new one.
  • The MIDI monitor moved from the STEP mode panel to a more useful place, next to the MIDI input configuration controls.